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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

dispel

dispel   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
10 words

... XVII. — L. dispellere , f. DIS- 1 + pellere ...

L

L   Quick reference

Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
1,028 words

...differences (1) Some disyllabic verbs ending in l and with second-syllable stress are usually written with l in BrE, ll in AmE: appal/appall, distil/distill, enrol/enroll, enthral/enthrall, instil/instill . Others have a single l in both varieties: control, compel, dispel, impel, repel, annul . Inflected and some derived forms have ll in both varieties: appalled, controlling, distillation, enrolling, installation (but enrolment, instalment chiefly in BrE). (2) Verbs ending in an unstressed vowel plus l ( to equal, travel, pencil ) normally...

lay

lay   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...lay rubber: see burn rubber at rubber . lay something at someone's door: see door . lay something on the table: see table . lay something on thick ( or with a trowel) grossly exaggerate or overemphasize something. informal lay something to rest soothe and dispel fear, anxiety, grief, and similar unpleasant emotions. lay something up in lavender preserve something carefully for future use. The flowers and stalks of lavender were traditionally used as a preservative for stored clothes. lay store by: see set store by at store...

Servant of the Queen, A

Servant of the Queen, A   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...of the Queen, A . The somewhat surprising title of Maud Gonne 's autobiography ( 1938 ). Any thoughts that this fierce Republican had gone soft are dispelled in her own foreword, ‘I Saw the Queen’, in which she describes a trip to Mayo, where (in Ballina) she was hailed as a heroine. On the way back to Dublin, she looks out of the train window … Then I saw a tall, beautiful woman with dark hair blown on the wind and I knew it was Cathleen ni Houlihan [ Cathleen Ní Houlihan , a personification of Ireland]. She was crossing the bog toward the hills,...

appeal

appeal   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
129 words

...contexts, appeal comes via Old French from Latin appellare ‘to address, accost, call upon’. Peal [LME] is a shortening of appeal, perhaps from the call to prayers of a ringing bell. The base of appeal is Latin pellere ‘to drive’, found also in compel ‘drive together’; dispel ‘drive apart’; expel ‘drive out’; impel ‘drive towards’; and impulsive ; propel ‘drive forwards’; repel ‘drive back’, all Late Middle English. It is also the source of the pulse [ME] that you can feel on your wrist and is related to push [ME] . The other kind of...

discuss

discuss   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
39 words

...A investigate, decide XIV; examine by argument XV ; B †dispel, disperse XIV. f. discuss- , pp. stem of L. discutere dash to pieces, disperse, dispel, in Rom. investigate; f. DIS- 1 + quatere shake. So discussion XIV. — OF. —...

dissipate

dissipate   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
46 words

...scatter, dispel XV; squander; distract XVII. f. pp. stem of L. dissipāre , f. DIS- 1 + * supāre , * sipāre throw; see -ATE 3 . So dissipation dissolution XV; †dispersion XVI; squandering XVII; distraction of mind XVIII, (hence) frivolous diversion, (passing into) dissolute living XVIII. — (O)F. or...

Chalcedony

Chalcedony   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...] A precious stone, consisting of half-transparent quartz: so called from Chalcedon, in Asia Minor, where it was first found. Its chief varieties are agate, carnelian, cat’s -eye, chrysoprase, flint, hornstone, onyx, plasma, and sard. Albertus Magnus (book i. chap. 2) says: ‘It dispels illusions and all vain imaginations. If hung about the neck as a charm, it is a defence against enemies, and keeps the body healthful and vigorous. from Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable ( 1896...

Security

Security   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Security blanket Something that dispels anxiety, such as an appointment diary carried on the person. The expression evolved in the 1960s from the blanket or piece of cloth held by a young child to reduce anxiety. An entirely different security blanket is an official sanction imposed on information to maintain secrecy on a particular matter. Security risk Governmental security is concerned with the prevention of leakages of confidential information, and ‘a security risk’ denotes a person of questionable loyalty, whose background and associations make...

Bes

Bes   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...in Egyptian mythology, a grotesque god depicted as having short legs, an obese body, and an almost bestial face, who dispelled evil...

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