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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness (Libya)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of African Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...Dispels the Darkness (Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, and a dispeller of darkness. In his solar aspect, he was identified with the two-horned Carthaginian Baal Hammon. He was not a major deity of cultivation or fertility, but rather a god of prophecy, a seer whose associations were with the departed, and whose—at times—enthroned, faceless mass appeared to represent the image of the deceased in a seated posture,...

Javanese Mythology

Javanese Mythology   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...feeds her family by magic, placing one grain of rice in the pot each day that produces more than ample food, but she does so only on the condition that her husband not look into the pot. Of course, when she is away one day he does look into the pot and the magic is immediately dispelled, making it necessary for the family to use rice supplies like everyone else. Disappointed in her husband, the bidadari finds her winged garment and flies off to the other...

Horus's Struggle with Set

Horus's Struggle with Set (Egypt)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of African Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...of the forms of Horus, representing as he does that form of Heru-Behutet that prevailed in the southern heavens at midday, typifying the greatest power of the heat of the sun. It was under this form that Horus waged war against Set (Typhon). Heru-Behutet is the power that dispels darkness and night, drives away clouds, rain, and storms, and fills heaven and the world with his brilliance and light. He created himself, renews his birth daily, year by year performs his course in the heavens, bringing in his train the seasons and their proper produce. He is...

Mithra

Mithra (West Asia)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... West Asia Of all the celestial beings ruling over the earth he was the most popular with the Persians, who represented him as the son of Ahura Mazdah. He was the light that preceded the sun when it rose, the one who dispelled darkness; and from his penetrating gaze could nothing be hidden. Mithra was aware of every happening, no matter how insignificant each might appear. In pre-Zoroastrian times Mithra and Ahura were most likely twin sky gods, looked upon as payu-thworeshtara , ‘the two creator-preservers’ of the cosmic order. Later theological...

Indonesian and Malaysian mythology

Indonesian and Malaysian mythology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

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Subject Reference

...feeds her family by magic, placing one grain of rice in the pot each day, which produces more than ample food, but she does so only on condition that her husband not look in the pot. Of course, when she is away one day he does look into the pot, and the magic is immediately dispelled, making it necessary for the family to use rice supplies like everyone else. Disappointed in her husband, the bidadari finds her winged garment and flies off to the other world. In another folk myth, of the central Celebes in Indonesia, the people of Poso tell how the ...

parātmasamatā

parātmasamatā (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...of his Bodhicaryāvatāra , Śāntideva , drawing apparently on the Tathāgataguhyasūtra , explains that there is no reason to cherish oneself over others, because both oneself and others equally wish for happiness and equally wish to avoid suffering. If suffering is to be dispelled, it should be done without distinguishing whether that suffering is experienced by oneself or by another sentient being. This equalizing of self and other is considered a prerequisite for the “exchange of self and other” ( parātmaparivartana...

Mahānidānasutta

Mahānidānasutta (C.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...In Pāli, the “Great Discourse on Causality”; the fifteenth sutta of the Dīghanikāya (a separate Dharmaguptaka recension appears as the thirteenth sūtra in the Chinese translation of the Dīrghāgama ); preached by the Buddha to Ānanda in the market town of Kammāsadhamma to dispel his wrong view that the doctrine of dependent origination ( P. paṭiccasamuppāda ; S. pratītyasamutpāda ) only appears to be profound. He then gives an exposition of dependent origination as a tenfold causal chain (rather than the typical twelvefold chain, dropping the first...

upādhyāya

upādhyāya (P.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...and, as necessary, to supply him with requisites, such as robes and an alms bowl. He should tend to his disciple if he is ill and discipline him if he commits some wrongdoing. If the disciple should begin to entertain doubts about the religion, the preceptor should try to dispel them. If the disciple should commit a grave offense against the monastic rules and regulations, the preceptor is to prevail upon him to go before the saṃgha to seek expiation. If the disciple misbehaves or becomes disobedient, the preceptor is enjoined to expel him. But if the...

Sammohavinodanī

Sammohavinodanī   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

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Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...Sammohavinodanī . In Pāli, “The Dispeller of Delusion,” a commentary by the influential Pāli scholar Buddhaghosa on the Vibhaṅga , the second book of the Pāli abhidhammapiṭaka . This work covers much of the same material found in Buddhaghosa’s Visuddhimagga , which is thought to be the earlier of the two works. In his introduction to Sammohavinodanī , Buddhaghosa claims to have drawn his analysis from more ancient commentaries. The work is divided into eighteen sections, beginning with an exposition on the five aggregates ( P. khandha , S. skandha )....

antevāsika

antevāsika (T.)   Reference library

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

...alms bowl, cleaning his residence, accompanying him on journeys, attending him when he is sick, and so forth. As part of his responsibilities toward the teacher, if the teacher should begin to entertain doubts about the doctrine or his ability to practice, the pupil is to try to dispel them. If the teacher should commit a grave offense against the rules of the saṃgha, the pupil is supposed to try to prevail upon his teacher to go before the saṃgha to receive its judgment. An antevāsika requires the permission of his ācariya to attend to others, to accompany...

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