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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

albariño

albariño   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...which means literally in Spanish ‘white (wine) from the Rhine’. It was probably brought to Spain in the twelfth century by Cluniac monks, and may well be a clone of the riesling grape. Its fresh, fragrant style helped considerably towards the end of the twentieth century in dispelling the negative image of Spanish white wines as heavy, over-oaked, and often...

Borage

Borage   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...They turn pink on contact with acids (lemon juice or vinegar). The flowers are also made into a syrup, or candied as cake decorations. Claims and folklore Borage has been part of European herbal medicine for centuries – the leaves and flowers steeped in wine were once said to dispel ‘melancholy’. It has also been suggested that extracts: give relief to symptoms of rheumatism, colds, and bronchitis; can induce sweating and diuresis; increase breast milk production in women; act as a remedy in breast cancer and facial cancer; and improve dry skin conditions....

ingredient labelling

ingredient labelling   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Wine (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...labelling . Since detailed specification on labels of ingredients in foodstuffs is mandatory in most major markets, it has been proposed that wine should also be subject to this requirement. Few wine producers are in favour since it would be complicated and could well dispel what is seen as the simple romance of wine—although presumably producers of natural wine may welcome any public airing of the wide array of additives and processing aids used by their more industrial rivals. Even some of the most lauded wines in the world may have to cite ...

Mencía

Mencía   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Wine (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...profiling laid to rest the once-popular theory that Mencía and Cabernet Franc were related, but more recently showed that the variety called jaen , or Jaen du Dão, is Mencía. In addition, the rediscovery by young winemakers of old, low-yielding hillside plots of Mencía has dispelled the notion that this variety necessarily produces light reds since wines of great concentration and complexity have emerged from these forgotten vineyards on deep schists and produced a priorat -like revolution in the region. It was the fertile plains on which Mencía was...

Lombardi’s

Lombardi’s   Reference library

Cindy R. Lobel

Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover’s Companion to New York City

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...the door of the original coal oven in the new space. The public face of the new Lombardi’s was its thirty-two-year-old manager, a self-styled pizza expert named Andrew Bellucci. Bellucci was thought by many to be the restaurant’s owner, a misconception he did little to dispel. Bellucci publicized the history of Lombardi’s and its excellent pizzas and, at a time when New York pizza had lost some of its luster, promised to lead a revival of the old, thin-crust, coal-fired Neopolitan style of pizza. The ubiquitous Bellucci appeared on local and national...

ngapi nut

ngapi nut   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...Burma (where its name indicates that it smells like the Burmese fermented fish paste, ngapi ) and Indonesia. The wine-red young shoots and the flowers are also eaten. The ‘nuts’, which are seeds borne in large pods, are served as a side dish in Java. Their offensive smell is dispelled when they are cooked. A popular treatment is to cook ripe seeds and then pound them into flat cakes which are sun-dried, fried, sprinkled with salt, and served as one of the side dishes called emping ( see gnetum...

goosefoot

goosefoot   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...cultivated. One exception is quinoa , a S. American species grown for its seeds. Common goosefoots whose leaves are eaten are described under good king henry , fat hen , and orach . Most goosefoots are available all the year round, and their somewhat bitter taste can be dispelled by cooking the leaves in one or two changes of water, after which the flavour is mild and...

hogweed

hogweed   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...leaves may be boiled and eaten as a green vegetable, and when just sprouting from the ground resemble asparagus in flavour. The experiment is, however, seldom tried, owing to the ignorance of those to whom such an addition to the table would be a benefit and luxury. Efforts to dispel the ignorance have not made much headway although Phillips ( 1983 ) followed Mrs Lankester ’s advice, and pronounced hogweed shoots to be ‘unequivocally one of the best vegetables I have...

urd

urd   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...bean. Moreover urd beans are not all black (as their alternative name ‘black gram’ would suggest), but may be green (the green ones are smaller and ripen later than the black ones); and green gram is one of the alternative names for mung bean. However, any possible confusion is dispelled when the two small pulses are peeled and split, thus becoming dal instead of gram , for the urd is then seen to be white inside while the mung is yellow. Urd has a good flavour, but is a notably solid foodstuff, needing longer cooking than most other small pulses, and...

water hyacinth

water hyacinth   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... Burkill ( 1965–6 ) suggests that the plant is handicapped by the name bunga jamban , which refers to its luxuriant growth in the vicinity of latrines. Ochse ( 1981 ) observes that it is eaten in Java but that its tendency to cause itching when eaten raw is not entirely dispelled by cooking; and it seems that Indonesians would anyway prefer other herbaceous waterplants, such as Monochoria spp, which are free of problems. However, the buds of the water hyacinth are appreciated in parts of the Philippines, as Gilda Cordero-Fernando ( 1976 ) explains:...

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