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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Briquel, Émilie

Briquel, Émilie (1875–1961)   Reference library

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
407 words

...to her and may well have turned to Jessie ‘on the rebound’ (171) Whether the news of émilie’s engagement precipitated Conrad’s proposal to Jessie is also impossible to gauge, although, as Najder suggests,‘the impression of some connection between both events is difficult to dispel’( JCC...

Peninsular War

Peninsular War   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
400 words

...War ( 1807–14 ). The Iberian peninsula (comprising Spain and Portugal) was the location of Britain's main military contribution to the Napoleonic Wars of 1802–15 . It played a major part in the defeat of France, sapping French resources and dispelling the popular myth of Napoleon's invincibility. The French invasion of the peninsula also meant that many in Britain who had previously supported Napoleon's fight against the tyranny of old regimes, now saw him as an aggressor for the first time. The British conception of the war was increasingly one of...

Heger family

Heger family   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
532 words

... M. Lucien Beckers ; both these families eventually inherited and looked after some of the family papers. Before her mother's death Louise was shown by her the four surviving letters that Charlotte Brontë had written to M. Heger . His wife had kept them as evidence that might dispel any ‘misapprehension’. After Mme Heger died in January 1890 , Louise handed the letters ‘in fear and trembling’ to her father, who ‘recognised them with astonishment, and, with a frown, flung them into’ a basket of discarded papers, whence they were rescued and preserved by...

Wuthering Heights. A Novel

Wuthering Heights. A Novel   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
5,285 words

...notice of the authors , | a selection from their literary remains , | and a preface , | by currer bell .’ Wuthering Heights had originally been presented to the public without preface or introduction. Charlotte proposed ‘a brief and simple notice of the authors’ to dispel ‘all erroneous conjectures’ about the identity of the authors (Smith Letters , 2. 466). She was keen to set the novel in a context and explain how a ‘homebred country girl’ might produce such a tale of violence and amorality that so shocked the public; and she also proposed to...

sequels and ‘incremental literature’

sequels and ‘incremental literature’   Reference library

Patsy Stoneman

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
5,186 words

...Heights ; the effect is to tell the story of a whole society, through which the tale of Razyé and his Catherine runs like a thread. While Emily Brontë 's narrators suggest and skirt around the central mystery of their relationship, however, the tellers of Windward Heights dispel mystery; the relationship here is emphatically sexual, so that the younger Catherine is born black, resembling though not knowing Razyé, whose son she meets and marries, and this involuntary incest provides the tragic catastrophe. Condé's novel has a story, an ethos, and a...

Bugler, Gertrude

Bugler, Gertrude (1897–1992)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
323 words

...at her home in Beaminster and begged her to withdraw from the project, advancing an array of reasons, from concern about Hardy's health should he insist on attending a London performance to the possible scandal consequent upon his visiting Bugler's dressing-room and the need to dispel rumours already circulating about his infatuation with Bugler. In the face of Florence Hardy 's near-hysteria, Bugler withdrew, and later that year the professional actress Gwen Ffrangçon-Davies brought Tess to the London stage. Bugler did play the role professionally soon...

renunciation

renunciation   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
617 words

...Madonna tending the inhabitants of the plague village, and then as celibate mother to Tessa and Tito's children. Nevertheless, despite the fact that Romola thus frees herself from the domination of men, the idealizing affirmations of the last part of the novel cannot entirely dispel doubts about the narrowness of the life beyond passion that her renunciation has brought her. The possibility advanced in Romola that renunciation may constitute a formative step is taken up in the later novels. Like Maggie Tulliver , Dorothea in Middlemarch first indulges...

essays

essays   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
740 words

...was unsigned (in the articles in the Pall Mall Gazette she used the pseudonym ‘Saccharissa’, and her contributions to the Fortnightly were the only articles she signed ‘George Eliot’), there has been some uncertainty about what is definitely her work. This has been largely dispelled by Thomas Pinney 's authoritative edition, Essays of George Eliot ( 1963 ), which lists the essays and reviews that can definitely be attributed to her (452–5), as well as mistaken attributions (456–9). He also indicates where areas of doubt still remain (452), and lists...

James, Henry

James, Henry (1843–1916)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to George Eliot

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,168 words

...Lubbock universalized and disseminated the peculiar Jamesian narrative values contained in the unfortunate collection of prefaces to his novels which James wrote late in his career ( see reputation, critical ). It was only after 1959 that this Jamesian influence began to be dispelled by criticism which explored the complex strategies of George Eliot 's texts. EDE Letters of Henry James , ed. Percy Lubbock , 2 vols. (1920). Ermarth, Elizabeth , ‘The Example of Henry James’, in Realism and Consensus in the English Novel: Time, Space and Narrative , 2nd edn....

Sea, the

Sea, the   Reference library

Allan H. Simmons

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,550 words

...tradition of adventure; the romance of life under sail; the use of the actual voyage as a metaphor for a journey from one state of experience to anther; and the untameable might of the ocean. The romantic and escapist idea of sea travel as adventure for adventure’s sake is soon dispelled In The Mirror of the Sea where Conrad identifies the prosaic and practical skills of seamanship that form ‘the moral side’ of such ‘bread-winning’ (24). The sea is always a means of earning a livelihood, and this commercial emphasis unites his sea fictions with the national...

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