Loading ...

You are looking at 1-8 of 8 entries  for:

All : dispel x
  • Early history (500 CE to 1500) x
Clear All

View:

Overview

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Military Religious Services

Military Religious Services   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
269 words

...soldiers sought repentance through prayer and tears; anyone failing to participate was severely punished. Before battle the soldiers were enjoined to resolve their differences, to fast, and to confess their sins before taking communion—measures intended to reinforce morale, to dispel anxiety and the fear of death, and to secure God's favor. Other prebattle rituals included the blessing of standards and weapons. After battle, proper services for the dead were observed and thanksgiving for victory was offered, esp. following such notable successes as the...

Durham

Durham   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
254 words
Illustration(s):
1

...their very existence, to St Cuthbert of Lindisfarne († 687 ), whose body and relics were brought here in 995 . The serious danger that the extraordinary popularity of this northern saint might then be used as a focus for Northumbrian political separatism was eventually dispelled by William I ; and from the episcopate of William of St Calais ( 1080–1096 ) onwards, a long sequence of bishops of Durham nearly always used their great power in the interests of the English Crown . It was Bishop St Calais too who in 1083 transformed the community of St...

Devil

Devil   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
389 words

...however, he involuntarily benefits humanity since man can prove his virtue in this contest. In everyday practice the Devil's foreknowledge (albeit limited) and power sometimes leads to confusion of good and evil forces, but a man possesses the means (esp. the cross ) to dispel him. The Devil was defeated by Christ but allowed to continue his activity against mankind; ignorant of his destiny the Devil blasphemes against God but at Christ's Second Coming ( Parousia ), he will be thrown into fire with his host. Magicians were said to use the Devil's help...

Ephesus

Ephesus   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
737 words

...was host to the Second Crusade and in 1206 recognized the Laskarids, under whom it became a center of learning. Nikephoros Blemmydes taught here, with George Akropolites and Theodore Laskaris among his pupils. The late 13th C. brought Turkish threats, temporarily dispelled by the Catalan Grand Company, which made Ephesus its base in 1304 ; it fell to the Turks of Aydin the same year. Traditions that associated Ephesus with St. Paul , the Apostle John, the Virgin, and the Seven Sleepers made it the natural site for the councils of 431 and 449...

Censer

Censer   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Cathedral, a large hanging thurible over a metre in height, which requires eight men to pull the rope that swings it through the transept arch. Non-liturgical use of censers continued in the medieval and Renaissance periods. In 1348 , during the Black Death, censers were used to dispel the foul air that was thought to have caused the plague. A censer being used as a therapeutic air purifier is depicted in the Death of St Anthony in the Belles Heures of Jean, Duc de Berry ( fl. 1405–8 ; New York, Cloisters, MS. 54.1.1, fol. 194 v ). In the 19th century,...

Plantagenet, House of

Plantagenet, House of   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...was limited almost entirely to maintaining fortifications, including the Tower of London and the fortifications of Newcastle. The exception, the completion of St Stephen’s Chapel, Palace of Westminster (partly destr.; see London , IV, 3(i)(a) ), was probably intended to dispel the taint of usurpation and to distance the King from the rebellious parties, as was the remodelling ( c. 1331–6 ) of the south transept and choir of St Peter’s Abbey, Gloucester (now the cathedral), to promote a cult of Edward II , although there is no documentary evidence of...

Troyes

Troyes   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
4,094 words
Illustration(s):
3

...are modest and stable and a three-storey elevation of arcade, glazed triforium, and a lofty clerestory linked to the triforium by continuous mullions. The interior lighting is unified by the deeply coloured glass of the clerestory, but this superficial impression of unity is dispelled on closer inspection, which reveals a sequence of building campaigns extending over three and a half centuries. This prolonged construction reflects inadequate funding, multiple structural disasters, and the depopulation and distress of the Hundred Years War ( 1337–1453 ) and...

Romanesque sculpture

Romanesque sculpture   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Medieval Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
49,604 words
Illustration(s):
3

...in style. The ample figures of the earlier group, weighted down by rigid draperies, have been compared with those of the Last Judgement on the west portal of Ste Foy, Conques ( see Conques, ste foy , 1) . In the later group of capitals the weighty quality is partly dispelled by the lively treatment of the drapery folds, perhaps suggesting Burgundian influence. The execution of facial features peculiar to the Auvergne—staring, open eyes, dazed and immobile under stereotyped hairstyles—is virtually identical in both groups. The figures and the many...

View: