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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

German–Soviet war

German–Soviet war   Reference library

Earl Ziemke

The Oxford Companion to World War II

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Military History, Social sciences, Warfare and Defence
Length:
11,672 words
Illustration(s):
7

...Konev, and South-West front under Malinovsky began RUMYANTSEV on 3 August. On 5 August, Model gave up Orel; Vatutin took Belgorod; and Stalin, in a special order of the day, declared that the ‘German legend’ of Soviet inability to wage a successful summer campaign had been dispelled. See also Kursk, battle of . Actually, a full-scale summer offensive would not be possible for some weeks yet, because Model kept three fronts tied up until 17 August and Manstein did likewise with three more until 23 August, when he evacuated Kharkov. But a major doubt had...

Consumerism

Consumerism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,809 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...toys, games, and jigsaw puzzles for children had become common. Not least, diet was more varied, with a greater range of fruit and vegetables. People owned more changes of clothes, particularly with the growing availability of cheaper calicoes and cottons. Efficient oil-lamps dispelled the age-old stygian gloom; gas lighting arrived with the new century, soon to be followed by railway travel and the electric telegraph. Outside the home, urban space was being spruced up. In many towns, straight, well-demarcated streets replaced the labyrinthine old warrens of...

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,935 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to Peacock, ‘a semi-barbarian in a civilized community’ because his craft belongs in a society where imagination and feeling are the only index to reality. Where Wordsworth turns to the poet to heal wounds inflicted by civilization, Peacock turns to the scientist and historian to dispel the merely subjective pronouncements of the poet. For Peacock, the literature of knowledge acts on the literature of power as an agent of disenchantment, a position which * Byron sketched in his suppressed Preface to Don Juan ( 1819–24 ) and put into practice in the rest of...

Landscape History: The Countryside

Landscape History: The Countryside   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
6,151 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...no weaker than the inferences which historians are frequently forced to make from oblique or patchy documentary evidence, yet it must be added that they are still mistrusted in some circles, perhaps because some practitioners have erred on the wild side. That mistrust would be dispelled if we were able to construct a typological atlas of landscape evidence, explaining each category, its value, and the limits of the inferences which may be drawn from it. The writing of landscape history also poses challenges. One poor type of writing is the catalogue. For...

Bunker Hill, Battle of

Bunker Hill, Battle of   Reference library

Donald R. Lennon

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Hill, Battle of The battle of Bunker Hill, fought on 17 June 1775 , helped to dispel the British view that rebellious American colonists would flee when faced with British army professionals. After the engagements at Lexington and Concord, volunteer forces assembled around Boston, headquarters of the British army. Fearing that the British would fortify strategic locations adjoining the city, Boston's Committee of Safety on 16 June ordered New England troops into the Charlestown peninsula north of Boston, to fortify Bunker Hill. This promontory,...

Châlons, battle of

Châlons, battle of (451)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...in the mêlée, but a ferocious counter-attack by Thorismond drove the Huns from the field. Although the battle of Châlons was not a catastrophe, it was of considerable significance as being the first time that Attila had been defeated and suffered serious casualties. Châlons dispelled the myth of invincibility that had worked so potently on both his enemies and allies. Chris...

Summer Palace of Yiheyuan

Summer Palace of Yiheyuan   Reference library

TzeHuey CHIOU-PENG

Berkshire Encyclopedia of China

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...up from the lakefront is the Longevity Hill (60 meters high), on which buildings cluster amidst a landscape designed with distinct features characteristic of Chinese classical gardens. Along a north-south axial line on the hill is the courtyard of a ceremonial hall (Cloud Dispelling Hall), followed by an imposing octagonal tower (Pavilion of Buddhist Incense) on a high platform, and a temple (Sea of Wisdom) wrapped in glazed ceramic tiles and miniature Buddhist images at the summit. Beyond these glittering architectural structures down the northern slope...

Annales Gandenses

Annales Gandenses   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...for the Flemings. Yet he did not absolve his fellow citizens of their excesses as they eagerly mopped up the battlefield at Courtrai by killing all the French they could, regardless of social status. As the annalist records, the massive defeat of French arms at Courtrai did not dispel King Philip IV’s ire against the region. In spite of the French loss in 1302 , Philip moved against Flanders in 1304 . The annalist again provides crucial details but a skewed conclusion for the resulting battle at Mons-en-Pèvéle; all the contemporary sources and modern...

Assassins

Assassins   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...as a common noun meaning a professional murderer. The etymology of the name “Assassins” was eventually correctly explained by the orientalists of the nineteenth century. Modern scholarship in Ismaili studies, based on authentic Ismaili sources, has now begun to deconstruct and dispel the medieval legends surrounding the Nizaris. It has also shown that the name “Assassins” is a misnomer rooted in a pejorative appellation and lacking basis in any communal or organized use of hashish by the Nizari Ismailis, who were deeply devoted to their community. [ See also ...

Fulbright, William

Fulbright, William (1905–1995)   Reference library

Jonathan A. Kolieb

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...of the war in Vietnam, questioning its efficacy, legality, and morality. Beginning in 1966 , Fulbright held several televised committee hearings on U.S. military involvement in Vietnam. As Fulbright himself developed a healthy distrust of the executive, so, too, did he help dispel the often blind trust that Americans had had for their government—and most especially for their presidents—during the first few decades of the Cold War. A recurrent theme in Fulbright's six books was a warning against the hubris that so often leads to the downfall of great...

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