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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Self, Colin

Self, Colin (17 July 1941)   Reference library

Benezit Dictionary of British Graphic Artists and Illustrators

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...that humans share an animal-like taste for destruction, he created works such as Leopardskin Nuclear Bomber No. 2 ( 1963 ) and Guard Dog on a Missile Base, No. 1 ( 1965 ) that juxtapose Cold War weaponry with fierce animal aggression. A trip to the USA did nothing to dispel his fears. In Hot Dog Sculpture ( 1965 ), he alluded to the darker side of consumerism. A giant cast polyester resin hotdog, a symbol of a new fast-food culture, appears charred by nuclear warfare. For Self, this sculpture should stand as a reminder of modern values for future...

Yan Peiming

Yan Peiming (1980)   Reference library

Benezit Dictionary of Asian Artists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...such as in 1988 at the Vauban barracks in Sète or in 1989 at the Musée Greuze in Tournus. At a solo exhibition in Paris in January 1991 he showed only large portraits of Mao, with this brief introduction on the invitation: ‘From his story began my own.’ This was intended to dispel the ambiguity of these portraits, which could easily be perceived as either propaganda or nostalgia, whereas Yan regarded this figure with neither adulation nor hatred. Because Mao's likeness was everywhere when Yan was a child, his face became intimately linked with scenes of...

Gainsborough, Thomas

Gainsborough, Thomas (1727)   Reference library

Benezit Dictionary of British Graphic Artists and Illustrators

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...the works from the exhibition. He subsequently refused to have any further dealings with the Academy. The hostility between Gainsborough and Sir Joshua Reynolds, has been much commented upon. However when Reynolds visited him on his deathbed and Gainsborough was at pains to dispel any vestige of enmity between Reynolds and himself. He faced death with commendable equanimity and is reported to have said to Reynolds that the two of them would ‘meet again in Heaven, with Van Dyck for company’. By 1750 , Gainsborough was painting three-quarter-length...

Arnold, Matthew

Arnold, Matthew (1822)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,107 words

...Trilling began his career by writing an intellectual biography of Arnold, and Leavis, despite his nearidolatrous deference to Eliot, vigorously defended Arnold against Eliot's strictures. In one of his essays, the poet Wallace Stevens ( 1989 ) remarks that “to see the gods dispelled in mid-air and dissolve like clouds is one of the great human experiences.” A historian contemplating the fate of Arnoldian humanism in the past three or four decades might have an experience similar to that which Stevens describes. In the early 1970s, a metaphysical revolution...

Essentialism

Essentialism   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
6,171 words

...of G. W. F. Hegel and such idealist followers as Benedetto Croce ( 1922 ) and Robin George Collingwood ( 1938 ). It was in this context that John A. Passmore ( 1954 ) attacked aestheticians for pretentiously saying nothing and for trying to retain mystery rather than dispel it. Aesthetics, he maintained, has presented us with empty and accommodating formulas based on an attempt to impose “a spurious unity” on a conflicted field. Most aesthetics books are dull because they fail to bring sharpness to their subject matters, and because they bring...

Islamic Aesthetics

Islamic Aesthetics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
5,854 words

...geometry, painting, and music. Comments on the curative value of beautiful paintings by the physician Muḥammad ibn Zakarīyā al-Rāzī ( 864–925 ) stress the practical benefits of aesthetic pleasure. Al-Rāzī recommends looking at wall paintings or paintings in books in order to dispel gloom and keep the humors in their proper balance. He claims that earlier (i.e., Greek) scholars had discovered the importance of using wall paintings in baths that depict animal combats, the embrace of lovers, as well as the trees and flowers of a garden, because each theme...

Science and Aesthetics

Science and Aesthetics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,988 words

...art induces pleasure, science discloses facts; unfettered inspiration makes for art, slavish adherence to methodological canons, for science; art is subjective, science objective. Such stereotypes consign art and science to hostile camps. In so doing, they misrepresent both. By dispelling such stereotypes, we gain a better understanding of the relations between the two disciplines. Counterexamples are legion. Michelangelo Buonarroti's Last Judgment , Joseph Conrad 's Heart of Darkness , and Gustav Mahler 's Ninth Symphony are dark, disconcerting, even...

Creativity

Creativity   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
8,256 words

...out to be rather small. Creativity and its cognates mean the ability to produce something original (in the sense of new rather than authentic) in the arts, in the sciences, and in any other endeavor. Attempts to explain this ability result in paradox. The paradox cannot be dispelled at the individual level, only at the social level of tradition. An ascription of creativity to an object, and by extension to its creator, is a social matter, rather than disclosure of an inherent property of thing or person. The Greek myth of the Muses as found in Homer and...

Hume, David

Hume, David   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
7,537 words

...service were new editions of his History and his posthumously published Dialogues concerning Natural Religion . Hume accepted the traditional view that the only way to plan for the future is to understand how and why things change; only a knowledge of causes can help us dispel our fears, explain the past, and influence what happens. But he held that many philosophers had misunderstood the nature of causal knowledge and had thus failed to benefit from it. To start with, an examination of the natural world must be grounded on a study of the investigator...

Tragedy

Tragedy   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
6,994 words

...passages of alternate-line dialogue known as “stichomythia,” and the narratives of news bringers (“messengers”), who typically use a form of the past tense that approximates it linguistically to the narratives of Homeric epic. Due attention to tragic language enables us to dispel the trivial observation that “nothing happens in Greek tragedy.” For example, the violence that many theatrical traditions exhibit on stage was, in Greece, enacted in words. Oedipus's self-blinding, Hippolytus's gruesome downfall, and Pentheus's rending by his mother lose nothing...

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