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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Anthony Davies, and Will Sharpe

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
4,098 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...for Mantua before the setting of the Watch. 3.4 Capulet agrees with his wife and Paris that Juliet shall marry Paris the following Thursday. 3.5 Early the following morning Romeo reluctantly parts from Juliet, descending from her window. Her mother brings Juliet the news that, to dispel the sorrow they attribute to Tybalt’s death, she is to marry Paris: Capulet arrives and, angry at Juliet’s refusal, threatens to disown her unless she agrees to the match. After her parents’ departure, the Nurse advises Juliet to marry Paris. Juliet feigns to agree, but resolves...

akee

akee   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Society and culture, Cookery, Food, and Drink
Length:
342 words
Illustration(s):
1

...cream-coloured aril (seed coat). This aril is the only edible part; the rest of the fruit is not safe to eat. Morton ( 1987 ) states that the toxin (hypoglycin, a propionic acid) has been shown to reside in the seeds and in unripe arils. What is in the unripe arils is largely dispelled by light when the fruit splits, but what is in the seeds remains; squirrels never eat the seeds. The akee is to be eaten at the peak of ripeness, just after the capsule splits, an occurrence which is often followed by a race between man and bird to reach the succulent fruit...

Durham

Durham   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
254 words
Illustration(s):
1

...their very existence, to St Cuthbert of Lindisfarne († 687 ), whose body and relics were brought here in 995 . The serious danger that the extraordinary popularity of this northern saint might then be used as a focus for Northumbrian political separatism was eventually dispelled by William I ; and from the episcopate of William of St Calais ( 1080–1096 ) onwards, a long sequence of bishops of Durham nearly always used their great power in the interests of the English Crown . It was Bishop St Calais too who in 1083 transformed the community of St...

Mithra

Mithra (West Asia)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... West Asia Of all the celestial beings ruling over the earth he was the most popular with the Persians, who represented him as the son of Ahura Mazdah. He was the light that preceded the sun when it rose, the one who dispelled darkness; and from his penetrating gaze could nothing be hidden. Mithra was aware of every happening, no matter how insignificant each might appear. In pre-Zoroastrian times Mithra and Ahura were most likely twin sky gods, looked upon as payu-thworeshtara , ‘the two creator-preservers’ of the cosmic order. Later theological...

Grolier, Codex

Grolier, Codex   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
679 words
Illustration(s):
1

...are a mixture of Maya, Toltec, Mixtec, and Borgia Group features. The aberrant numeration and topical focus of the Grolier Codex , along with its eclectic style and organization, led some scholars originally to question the manuscript's authenticity. However, later study has dispelled the strongest of these objections. The Grolier Codex likely came from a mixed culture, where Mayan and Mexican languages were spoken and where Maya and Mexican ideological traditions were enmeshed with each other. The awkward use of pseudo “ring numbers” and the dots...

Indonesian and Malaysian mythology

Indonesian and Malaysian mythology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference

...feeds her family by magic, placing one grain of rice in the pot each day, which produces more than ample food, but she does so only on condition that her husband not look in the pot. Of course, when she is away one day he does look into the pot, and the magic is immediately dispelled, making it necessary for the family to use rice supplies like everyone else. Disappointed in her husband, the bidadari finds her winged garment and flies off to the other world. In another folk myth, of the central Celebes in Indonesia, the people of Poso tell how the ...

Hallucinogens

Hallucinogens   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mesoamerican Cultures

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
959 words
Illustration(s):
1

...on the “heathen superstitions” surviving among his Nahuatl-speaking parishioners in Guerrero, describes enemas of peyote, an aquatic Datura called atl inan ( atl , “water”; inan , “mother”), and ololiuhqui , accompanied by chants in Nahuatl commanding the sacred plants to dispel the fever and bring about visions identifying its cause. This hollow ceramic figurine found in a chamber tomb in the Pacific coastal state of Colima, settled, once and for all, the question of intoxicating snuff use in Mesoamerica, paralleling its ritual importance in Central and...

Drew, Charles Richard

Drew, Charles Richard (b. 3 June 1904   Reference library

Encyclopedia of African American History 1896 to the Present

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
727 words
Illustration(s):
1

...convention on 1 April 1950 , Drew suffered severe injuries in an automobile accident in North Carolina. He was taken to a local hospital and died in the emergency room. A long-held belief was that Drew's race affected the quality of care he received. His traveling companions dispelled this rumor and said Drew received the best of care. A pioneer in scientific research and a mentor for many young African American physicians, Drew made contributions to the field of medicine in blood banking and blood preservation that are still useful in modern times. Charles...

Tshombe, Moı¨se Kapenda

Tshombe, Moı¨se Kapenda (1919)   Reference library

Dictionary of African Biography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
1,090 words
Illustration(s):
1

...years, apparently depressed about his fate and his declining presence in the international press. With the United States increasingly determined to back Mobutu in the late 1960s, Tshombe had few influential supporters left. On 29 June 1969 , Tshombe died from a heart attack. To dispel rumors that Tshombe died from foul play, a team of eleven doctors conducted an autopsy and publicly announced their results. He was buried on 5 July 1969 in Brussels. Since the 1990s, some Congolese have reconsidered Tshombe as an unjustly maligned pioneer of federal rule. [...

Romulus and Remus

Romulus and Remus   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,107 words
Illustration(s):
1

...earliest mention of Romulus’ deification is a fragment from Ennius: “Romulus lives for ever in the sky with the gods that gave him birth” ( Annales F 110). Cicero ( De republica 2.20) reports a story that Romulus’ deification as Quirinus was proclaimed by Proculus Julius to dispel the suspicion that the senators were responsible for Romulus’ death. The tradition that Romulus was torn in pieces by senators appears in Livy (1.16) and Dionysius (2.56), with the latter commenting on Romulus’ tyrannical behavior. Both authors give an alternative version that...

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